Bird Roll Call: November 25, 2017

  • American crow
  • American robin1
  • Black-capped chickadee3
  • Black-eyed junco1
  • Blue jay1
  • Canada goose5
  • Carolina wren1
  • Downy woodpecker1
  • Eastern bluebird2
  • European starling5
  • Gadwall4
  • Great blue heron3
  • House finch1
  • House sparrow1
  • Killdeer4
  • Mallard4
  • Mourning dove1
  • Northern cardinal1
  • Northern flicker1
  • Red-bellied woodpecker3
  • Red-shouldered hawk*2
  • Red-tailed hawk5
  • Red-winged blackbird2
  • Rock pigeon5
  • Song sparrow2
  • Tufted titmouse*3
  • White-breasted nuthatch*3
  • White-throated sparrow
  • Yellow-bellied sapsucker1
  • Yellow-rumped warbler2

Locations — in my backyard, at Powell Gardens, and driving to and from these locations. A single asterisk indicates first sighting.


1. Seen at home
2. Seen at Powell Gardens
3. Seen at a pond and at someone’s feeder just outside of Powell Gardens
4. Probably seen at Meadowbrook Park
5. Seen while driving

Twitter: Human Contact

I saw a sign that read, “Ring Bell for Human Contact.” I did not ring the bell.

When shade turns to sun, dark-eyed juncos are the first to emerge from the brush.

After several dark days, the sun coming through this window might as well be a god.

When I was filling the birdbath, a blue jay did his best impression of a red-tailed hawk. I think he wanted to bathe all by himself.

The male cardinal is a grace note in the bare rose of Sharon.

A highway runs through one of our wetland areas. Shame on us.

A shadow crosses the highway. Above, a red-tailed hawk.

You know you’re going to die, and you live anyway. That’s how it is.

I have edited the landscape to include more detritus.

The last leaves on the crabapple tree: ornaments.

I only answered the door because I thought you were a bird.

Unordered list: waxing crescent moon, bare maple tree, dull opal sky.

The remaining leaves sound like dry grasses.

Black Friday. I can’t get to the wetlands fast enough.

The snow geese fly in the shape of a swallow.

Scatter my ashes in the prairie cordgrass.

Four red-tailed hawks soar above our subdivision.

Starlings carry the shape of power lines into the air.

Death won’t happen to me. I won’t be there. – Jose Faus

Bird Roll Call: November 24, 2017

  • American coot2
  • American crow
  • Bald eagle2
  • Black-eyed junco1
  • Blue jay1
  • Brown-headed cowbird2
  • Canada goose2
  • Chipping sparrow2
  • Dickcissel*2
  • Downy woodpecker1
  • Gadwall2
  • Grackle sp.2
  • Green-winged teal2
  • House finch1
  • House sparrow1
  • Mallard2
  • Northern cardinal1
  • Northern flicker (yellow-shafted)1
  • Northern harrier2
  • Northern pintail2
  • Northern shoveler2
  • Pied-billed grebe2
  • Red-tailed hawk3
  • Red-winged blackbird2
  • Sandhill crane (pair)*2
  • Snow goose2
  • Song sparrow2
  • Trumpeter swan2

Locations — in my backyard, at Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Preserve, and driving to and from these locations. A single asterisk indicates first sighting.


1. Seen at home
2. Seen at Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Preserve
3. Seen while driving

My location notes for this roll call are incomplete. I didn’t gather that data at the time but have added what I remember about the locations for these sightings.

Bird Roll Call: November 18, 2017

  • Accipier sp.2
  • American coot2
  • American crow
  • American goldfinch1
  • American kestrel2
  • American robin1
  • American tree sparrow2
  • American white pelican2
  • Black-capped chickadee<2/li>
  • Blue jay1
  • Brown creeper*2
  • Bufflehead*2
  • Canada goose2
  • Carolina wren1
  • Cedar waxwing (thiry-two)2
  • Common goldeneye2
  • Cowbird2
  • Dark-eyed junco1
  • Downy woodpecker1
  • Eastern bluebird2
  • European starling3
  • Great blue heron2
  • Herring gull*2
  • Hooded merganser (male and female)*2
  • Horned grebe*2
  • House finch1
  • House sparrow1
  • Mallard2
  • Mourning dove1
  • Northern cardinal1
  • Northern flicker1
  • Northern harrier2
  • Northern pintail2
  • Pied-billed grebe2
  • Red-bellied woodpecker1
  • Ring-billed gull
  • Rock pigeon3
  • Song sparrow2
  • Tufted titmouse2
  • Western grebe*2
  • Western meadowlark*2
  • White-throated sparrow1
  • Wild turkey*3
  • Yellow-rumped warbler2

Locations — in my backyard, at Perry Lake, and driving to and from these locations. A single asterisk indicates first sighting.


1. Seen at home
2. Seen at Perry Lake
3. Seen while driving

My location notes for this roll call are incomplete. I didn’t gather that data at the time but have added what I remember about the locations for these sightings.

Bird Roll Call: November 17, 2017

  • Accipiter sp.2
  • American coot2
  • American crow
  • American robin1
  • American tree sparrow2
  • Bald eagle (pair)2
  • Blue jay1
  • Canada goose2
  • Chipping sparrow2
  • Cooper’s hawk1
  • Dark-eyed junco1
  • European starling3
  • Great blue heron (five)2
  • Green-winged teal2
  • Harris’s sparrow2
  • House finch1
  • House sparrow1
  • Killdeer2
  • Mallard2
  • Mourning dove1
  • Northern cardinal1
  • Northern harrier2
  • Pied-billed grebe2
  • Red-tailed hawk3
  • Red-winged blackbird2
  • Ring-billed gull2
  • Rock pigeon3
  • White-throated sparrow1

Locations — in my backyard, at Baker Wetlands, and driving to and from these locations.


1. Seen at home
2. Seen at Baker Wetlands

My location notes for this roll call are incomplete. I didn’t gather that data at the time but have added what I remember about the locations for these sightings.

Twitter: Secretive Nature

I want to upcycle Congress into an old-growth forest.

My bird name would be the beaver-toothed ruminator.

I’m pretty sure the geese don’t call this place Kansas.

Starlings perch on power lines above the trainyard.

I just read about a type of sparrow that has a “secretive nature.” Intriguing.

One squirrel munches on an acorn while the others kuk and quaa over a Cooper’s hawk.

The great horned owl is out hunting on our street today. Between him and the Cooper’s hawk, the crows and blue jays are raising a racket.

Today, I saw the sparrow described as having a “secretive nature.” What a beauty.

The noisy rooks pass over, and you may / Pace undiverted through the netted light / As silent as a thrush with work to do — John Hewitt

I’m just here for the beauty.

No killdeer across the street. For now, the new development has won.

The recycling truck’s brakes sing like a forlorn bird.

One of the functions of language is to facilitate the creation of memories. Once we have memory, we have a past and a presumed future.

Language is not how we experience the world. It’s how we editorialize about our experiences.

As soon as I say “hawk,” I am no longer experiencing the hawk.

There’s a lot of goose poo on my shoe. I don’t know what to do.

Yesterday, I followed a kestrel through a small field.

Talk about theories all you like, but when it rains, go outside.

In place of leaves, red-winged blackbirds.

The pied-billed grebe’s white stomach shimmers like an ostrich egg.

Bird Roll Call: November 13, 2017

  • Carolina wren**
  • Downy woodpecker**
  • House finch**
  • Redhead*

Locations — in my backyard and at Meadowbrook Park. This is not a complete list of the birds I saw. At this time, I was only recording notable birds. A single asterisk indicates first sighting. A double asterisk indicates first sighting in our yard.


1. Seen at home
2. Seen at Meadowbrook Park

My location notes for this roll call are incomplete. I didn’t gather that data at the time but have added what I remember about the locations for these sightings.